1,000 hectares of construction space sanctioned in Dubai

By Sophie Chapman
Up until December last year, the Dubai Municipality approved 1,000 hectares of space to be used for construction projects. The developments will includ...

Up until December last year, the Dubai Municipality approved 1,000 hectares of space to be used for construction projects.

The developments will include residential, commercial, public services, mixed-use, tourist, and open area projects.

According to the Municipality’s Assistant General Director, Eng Dawoud Al Hajiri, seven major development projects were approved in 2017.

In regards to space, 71% more project area was approved in 2017 than in 2016, with urban project floor area rising by 73% in the review period.

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The Municipality has been focusing on reducing the time of master plan approval of major urban projects.

The Director of the Planning Department, Eng Najib Mohammed Saleh, noted that the department approved 500 project applications last year.

Approval took “an average implementation time of no more than eight days, or 16% less than in 2016,” the Director announced.

In 2017, the Municipality also successfully prepared 13 studies for the renovation of areas in the city.

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