Japan to replace retired workers with robots

By Sophie Chapman
Many Japanese companies are currently working on developing robots that can be used for jobs that are traditionally given to people. The robots, howeve...

Many Japanese companies are currently working on developing robots that can be used for jobs that are traditionally given to people.

The robots, however, will not be replacing current workers – they will be used to fill the gap of the generation of Japanese workers entering retirement.

At the moment, more than 25% of Japan’s population is over the age of 65, with the figure expected to reach 40% in 40 years’ time.

As automation has not been as easily integrated into construction as many other industries, companies may struggle without the workforce.

Many companies have developed robots, or are in the process of doing so, but few have deployed them.

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Shimizu, the architectural and contracting company, is ready to trial three different autonomous construction robots.

One of the robots is a carrier, designed to travel and lift materials as well as avoid obstacles.

The second technology features a robotic arm and lasers, used to determine welding options on steel columns.

The final robots is a multi-purpose devices used for construction works on ceiling and floors.

Shimizu claims that the robots will be able to work alongside people, creating a “next-generation production system in which robots and humans will collaborate”.

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